Stories of Maun

Maun – Place of Reeds


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Weekly Photo Challenge: Simple

Simple; what is Simple?

The iOS 5 in-built dictionary describes Simple as ‘easily understood or done; presenting no difficulty’.

For me, the most simplicity can be found in nature…

The simplicity of a sunset, but the profound beauty it can bring. If only economics could learn from mother nature.

A fan palm tree blowing in the wind; the sound made by the leaves as the wind blows through can only be heard to be appreciated.

A flower, it’s only purple. But man does it’s beauty shine through when the sunlight hits it just right.

…and, as if to be a culmination of the individual parts that make up the whole, this scene of the Thamalakane riverfront is reminiscent of an orchestra, a symphony divine to the senses, but definitive of the word simple because it is easily understood.


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Weekly Photo Challenge: Peaceful

Here is my entry for the Weekly Photo Challenge themed Peaceful.

What could be more peaceful than…

having a relaxing fishing session with your boys. Or…

a slow, relaxed boat cruise on the still waters of a majestic river such as the Boro. Or how about…

floating, alone but still at peace, along the wide open ‘River of Dreams’.

Peace can be defined as ‘freedom from disturbance’ and ‘quiet and tranquility’. Along the rivers of life, peace can be found; along the shores of the earths great rivers, peace prevails, as you relax and can hear nothing but the sound of flowing water, and can see nothing but the reflection of the heavens above in the crystal clear waters below. That, is my idea of peace.


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Weekly Photo Challenge: Between

Here is my entry to the Weekly Photo Challenge themed Between.

In between.

The flight in this picture is In Between. Behind it lies 2011, represented by the empty blue sky. The occupants of the flight know what they leave behind them; in the vast blue expaneses of an empty sky lies the year that was, 2011, the opportunities that were abound in plenty, whether taken or abandoned, nonetheless were there for the taking. The emptiness and the flight moving forward represent that the occupants know what they leave behind and still they progress forward because it is the only path that can be taken. However, they progress with caution because they know not what the next chapter, 2012, holds for them.

The cloud that bears an uncanny resemblance to a plume of white smoke represents the year 2012, and the flight approaches this cloud. Smoke because it is unknown what awaits them, but white smoke at the same time because there is hope still for a brighter tomorrow, even in the face of uncertainty and dark days.


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The Thamalakane River

Through Maun flows the Thamalakane River. The river derives its flow from the Boro River, which itself is one of the main channels that drains the Okavango Delta. The Thamalakane in turn feeds the Boteti River, which begins its course at Toteng, almost 70km South West of Maun.

The Thamalakane River

I’m sure most, if not all Maun residents will recognise where this is. For years the river would dry up during the dry months and only have water again during the rainy season, when an influx of water comes in from the Okavango Delta, which gets its water from the Angolan Highlands and the Kavango River.

However the past few years have seen big floods and the revival of waterways once thought to be extinct, and as such the Thamalakane flows year round. Even the boundary fence of the Lechwe Centre Educational Park has gone under, as can be seen in this next picture.

View of The Educational Park

As a result of the flooding, the park has been closed to the public the past two years as water resides even inside the park, which it never has before.

These pictures form part of the ‘thamalakane river’ album, be sure to check out the rest of the pictures here.

Happy last few days of 2011! ­čÖé


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Christmas Day excitement

Yes, I know, Christmas was three days ago. But hey, can you blame me if I only got over this now?

A hippopotamus in the Thamalakane River

I tell you, it’s not often that you get to see a hippo, even when you have a river such as the Thamalakane flowing through your┬á home village. So when a sighting does occur, it is usually coupled with excitement, more so that we spotted this particular boy (or girl) on a family outing to Samedupi on Christmas Day.

Now the event didn’t last long, under 2 minutes I should say, and the hippo kept diving under (we only saw his head, like in the picture above, twice), but just the mere fact that there was a hippo to be seen was enough to send jolts of excitement through the group. The little ones were most excited, with the older group members lifting them up to say “there, there, do you see it?”.

Wild animal visitation and sightings are not unheard of in and around Maun, with the occasional reports of elephant and sometimes buffalo coming close to the village. This is because of Maun’s proximity to the Okavango Delta.

Happy festives everyone!


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Time for a test drive…

No, not a vehicle test drive, but merely me attempting my first blog post. Blame that on a lack of a better term, or allow me to regress and rather say “Time to get my feet wet…”

But then again, now you might think this is a blog about swimming. In the river. Eish.

Welcome to the Stories of Maun blog. As I have made aware, this is my first post (and I hope Stories of Maun shows up there somewhere). This is just a blog about Maun, the quiet and yet oh so busy village (although it’s more than big enough to be a town) in the North West District of Botswana, sometimes referred to as the Ngamiland.

Maun, as most if not all locals will tell you, is The Place of Reeds. Well, Place of Reeds is the ‘official’ nickname, but more so because Maun literally is a place of reeds, with the beautiful Thamalakane River flowing through the village. It is also the famed Gateway to the Okavango Delta (no joke, that’s how Maun is known the world over. Well, for those who have heard of Maun anyway.). Most visitors wishing to enjoy the beauty and serenity of our nation’s jewel will at some point pass through Maun, be it through flying to the camps in small charter aircraft, or stoping over as part of a driving or Mobile Safari. Because of this, part of the substantial development and growth of the village has been due to tourism, as most camps and lodges that operate in and around the Delta are based in Maun, providing much needed employment for the locals as well.

This is just an introductory post, more to come soon, with the first posts focusing on the history of the village. For now, let me leave you with some scenes from Maun…

Maun, The Place of Reeds

New Mall, the busiest place in Maun